TV

Netflix's Dear White People Is A Totally Awesome Show I Think Everyone Should Watch

A few months ago, when a 30 second trailer dropped for the new Netflix series  Dear White People,  and stuck in the craw of so many alt-right trolls, my expectations for this show were immediately set pretty high. I was a fan of the 2014 film this show is based on, and while I enjoyed the movie, I felt it left a lot of meat on the bone as far as other topics and issues that were touched on and that effect black people, but weren't explored as deeply as they could've been. One can only delve so far into so many issues within the parameters of a 2 hour movie when you have to introduce characters, set up a conflict, and wrap that conflict up in a nice neat conclusion.  This show, however, addresses those issues and then some and make for some pretty interesting TV! Despite the title (which some out there would argue encourage white genocide), a lot of the show centers on the internal conflicts of the black community. It examines what it truly means to be "woke" in this day and age. Is it holding on to an ideology and methods that have proven to be somewhat outdated? Is it bringing about change from within the "system"? Is it wearing your hair a certain way? Do any of these things matter when you can't affect the kind of change you want to see? How woke can a black person be when they fight against and look down on fellow black people who happen to disagree with them?  The series also boldly confronts the issues of interracial dating, colorism, homosexuality, racial profiling of police, the hedonistic side of college life, white appropriation of black music, even how the media trains people to go after certain stories while avoiding others. All while sprinkling in scenes depicting a lot of the unfortunate happenings we see in the news everyday reminding us that we don't live in this paradise-like, post-racial, all accepting world that was birthed on Election Day, 2008.  The show balances poignant scenes with just the right amount of humor and characters that you feel you know or even see yourself in. Many characters are what-you-see-is-what-you-get throughout the series, but some characters go through some serious arcs as the episodes play on. And I like watching complex characters with many sides to them showing that they are neither all good, nor all bad. Or in these cases, all woke or all sellout.  My expectations for this show were high, and while it is not perfect, it does not disappoint either. I strongly recommend this show for anybody out there looking for a new series to binge on, no matter how old they are or what color they are.  Can't wait for season 2...

A few months ago, when a 30 second trailer dropped for the new Netflix series Dear White People, and stuck in the craw of so many alt-right trolls, my expectations for this show were immediately set pretty high. I was a fan of the 2014 film this show is based on, and while I enjoyed the movie, I felt it left a lot of meat on the bone as far as other topics and issues that were touched on and that effect black people, but weren't explored as deeply as they could've been. One can only delve so far into so many issues within the parameters of a 2 hour movie when you have to introduce characters, set up a conflict, and wrap that conflict up in a nice neat conclusion.

This show, however, addresses those issues and then some and make for some pretty interesting TV! Despite the title (which some out there would argue encourage white genocide), a lot of the show centers on the internal conflicts of the black community. It examines what it truly means to be "woke" in this day and age. Is it holding on to an ideology and methods that have proven to be somewhat outdated? Is it bringing about change from within the "system"? Is it wearing your hair a certain way? Do any of these things matter when you can't affect the kind of change you want to see? How woke can a black person be when they fight against and look down on fellow black people who happen to disagree with them?

The series also boldly confronts the issues of interracial dating, colorism, homosexuality, racial profiling of police, the hedonistic side of college life, white appropriation of black music, even how the media trains people to go after certain stories while avoiding others. All while sprinkling in scenes depicting a lot of the unfortunate happenings we see in the news everyday reminding us that we don't live in this paradise-like, post-racial, all accepting world that was birthed on Election Day, 2008.

The show balances poignant scenes with just the right amount of humor and characters that you feel you know or even see yourself in. Many characters are what-you-see-is-what-you-get throughout the series, but some characters go through some serious arcs as the episodes play on. And I like watching complex characters with many sides to them showing that they are neither all good, nor all bad. Or in these cases, all woke or all sellout.

My expectations for this show were high, and while it is not perfect, it does not disappoint either. I strongly recommend this show for anybody out there looking for a new series to binge on, no matter how old they are or what color they are.

Can't wait for season 2...

Dear White People, You Gots To Chill!

 

 

Dear White People, You Gots To Chill!

By Bug One

 

   There's a saying that's existed for a long time now that goes "Only a hit dog hollers." And judging by the fallout from various caucasians over the 35 second teaser trailer for the upcoming Netflix series "Dear White People" (based off the underrated 2014 film), there are still plenty of insensitive trolls out there who frankly don't like to be told that they can't dehumanize minorities. To be honest, I heard about the white outrage over this trailer before I even heard that this new television series existed. And since I had already seen the movie, I'm thinking "Maybe they kicked it up a notch? Maybe in this trailer they are really holding up a mirror to all the bigots out there and really giving some scathing observations and criticisms." Then I saw the trailer. And to be honest, the only real take away was blackface=bad+offensive. That's it. No "why do white people put mayonnaise on and in everything?" No "Boy, they sure can't dance!" Not even a "Why did so many of you vote in a pathelogical liar into the White House?"  But then again, how much social commentary can you really fit in 35 seconds?! Apparently enough to piss off a segment of White America known as the "alt-right".

   A quick clip of a young black woman asking very nicely and articulately for her white schoolmates not to don blackface on Halloween because it is offensive was enough for some out there to say Netflix was promoting a show that encouraged "white genocide" and was "racist" and have organized a boycott of Netflix just for carrying the show. A show that hasn't even aired yet!  I really need someone to explain this one for me. Is it racist for an oppressed group to say "hey, stop oppressing us?" Or "please don't do that thing we find offensive."? Is asking a group to be a little more thoughtful in how they relate to another group equivalent to genocide??!!!? Maybe in their minds their right to be as ugly and as racist as they want to be is such an integral part of their identity and psyche, seeing us lowly darkies even DARE to tell them to stop is such a wigflip they have no choice but to react as if we're carving out a piece of their hearts? Maybe the ability and freedom to poke fun at and devalue other humans is just that precious to them and they feel that's all they have to instill a sense of pride in their pitiful selves and its worth fighting for? Maybe for some of them, that is all they have?  I don't know, and I'm sure I'll never understand. I just hope the show is as good as the movie, insightful, entertaining, and a huge success. And kudos to Netflix for carrying it.

   And to the white folks out there who feel a TV show is going to upend 300+ years of white supremacy and bring forth the death of the white race, in the words of EPMD, you gots to chill.