Does money rule the world? By Tyreek Peppers

“Money can't buy love.” I've been thinking about that quote for a while now. I mean, would that quote be untrue to people like actors and actresses? For actor and actresses, when it comes to a certain scene in the movie—like a love scene—I believe they get paid to do that. I think the well-known quote “Money can't buy love” needs to be rewritten.

“Money can't buy Genuine love, because love cannot be brought.” I believe that money rules the world, you have to really think about it to understand what I'm saying, though. A couple of years ago—in the legal system—if you were a lower-class citizen and you went to court you’d probably lose the case. In times like those, if you were to sued by someone richer than you were, you’d lose the case. The judge, a person that is supposed to stand for justice, stood for money and the upper class back then.

The title of this blog comes from a time in my life when  I would think deeply about how little money I had. There would be times when I saw something that I liked, but didn’t have enough cash. Plus, on top of that, I like to look very nice; a good outfit completes me. I also like video games and buying amazing movies, but they cost money, not to mention purchasing food, and paying rent to keep a roof over our head.  

A lot of things in this world cost something. As much as I keep talking, prices are going up right at this second. Next thing you know, we'll be all paying for air. I could understand paying for light, gas, or even keeping the cable on. But to pay for something every human being needs like water is ridiculous. To make this short, everything around us runs on Money.

Music Critics Vs. The "Streets" by Bug One

   The release of Kendrick Lamar's new album Damn. has once again shown me the huge differences between how music critics digest albums and how the "streets" digest music (by the term 'streets' I'm referring to the general public of rap fans currently buying music). Let me first say that I thought this last album by Kendrick was phenomenal. And from everything I've read online, most of the music critics out there agree with me or at least felt the album was well above average. His perspective, approach, creativity and voice is much needed in the genre of mainstream rap that has grown increasingly materialistic, shallow, hedonistic, and savage.    But unfortunately, the vast majority of young (and not so young) rap fans I talk to about the album really aren't feeling it. For my 9 to 5, I'm in and out of grocery stores all over the south side of Chicago staffed with fellow black men between the ages of 18 and 40 and naturally we get into discussions on current events, politics, and of course music. The overall reception of the album was unenthusiastic and the overall opinion of Kendrick was that he was a "weirdo rapper", "not black enough", "doesn't go in hard enough", "too laid back", and I even heard one guy say he "wasn't savage enough" and attributed his fame and record sales to "niggas on the west coast". Everybody has their right to an opinion (especially with something as subjective as music), but I just don't know what album they were listening to! Now I heard similar complaints about Kendrick when he released To Pimp A Butterfly about him being too weird and not giving the streets what they want to hear and I disagreed then too.     It's all made me wonder why the streets hardly ever embrace the same music that music critics hold in such high regard. Is it because they live different types of lives so feed off different types of vibes? Is it that music critics get their music for free so aren't as demanding and picky as far as what they want to hear? Is it that they've listened to sooo much music due to their profession that they are more welcoming to left field, artistic risk-taking? Do we need more music critics that are actually from the streets or even still "in the streets"? Are cats in the streets dumbed down so much by everything else classified as rap that a Kendrick Lamar comes off...well, weird? I really don't have the answers. I wish I did so this article could be longer. But I do know what I like, and I do know I vibe with all of Kendrick's releases heavily. He's 4 for 4 currently on his first 4 LP's, which hasn't been done in rap in a loooong time. And I do know that rap music that's universally heralded by critics (as of lately) usually gets dissed or ignored by the majority of the hood, but I kind of blame that partially on the extinction of record stores.    What do ya'll think? Do music critics just have bad taste in hip hop? Do I? Do street cats just not want to hear weirdo rap? Am I polling the wrong people? Is there such thing as music people want to hear but also music people need to hear? What do ya'll think? 'Cause I ain't got the answers, Sway.

   The release of Kendrick Lamar's new album Damn. has once again shown me the huge differences between how music critics digest albums and how the "streets" digest music (by the term 'streets' I'm referring to the general public of rap fans currently buying music). Let me first say that I thought this last album by Kendrick was phenomenal. And from everything I've read online, most of the music critics out there agree with me or at least felt the album was well above average. His perspective, approach, creativity and voice is much needed in the genre of mainstream rap that has grown increasingly materialistic, shallow, hedonistic, and savage.

   But unfortunately, the vast majority of young (and not so young) rap fans I talk to about the album really aren't feeling it. For my 9 to 5, I'm in and out of grocery stores all over the south side of Chicago staffed with fellow black men between the ages of 18 and 40 and naturally we get into discussions on current events, politics, and of course music. The overall reception of the album was unenthusiastic and the overall opinion of Kendrick was that he was a "weirdo rapper", "not black enough", "doesn't go in hard enough", "too laid back", and I even heard one guy say he "wasn't savage enough" and attributed his fame and record sales to "niggas on the west coast". Everybody has their right to an opinion (especially with something as subjective as music), but I just don't know what album they were listening to! Now I heard similar complaints about Kendrick when he released To Pimp A Butterfly about him being too weird and not giving the streets what they want to hear and I disagreed then too. 

   It's all made me wonder why the streets hardly ever embrace the same music that music critics hold in such high regard. Is it because they live different types of lives so feed off different types of vibes? Is it that music critics get their music for free so aren't as demanding and picky as far as what they want to hear? Is it that they've listened to sooo much music due to their profession that they are more welcoming to left field, artistic risk-taking? Do we need more music critics that are actually from the streets or even still "in the streets"? Are cats in the streets dumbed down so much by everything else classified as rap that a Kendrick Lamar comes off...well, weird? I really don't have the answers. I wish I did so this article could be longer. But I do know what I like, and I do know I vibe with all of Kendrick's releases heavily. He's 4 for 4 currently on his first 4 LP's, which hasn't been done in rap in a loooong time. And I do know that rap music that's universally heralded by critics (as of lately) usually gets dissed or ignored by the majority of the hood, but I kind of blame that partially on the extinction of record stores.

   What do ya'll think? Do music critics just have bad taste in hip hop? Do I? Do street cats just not want to hear weirdo rap? Am I polling the wrong people? Is there such thing as music people want to hear but also music people need to hear? What do ya'll think? 'Cause I ain't got the answers, Sway.

Rappers That I'm Calling It Quits On by Bug One

   Sadly, anyone who's been a fan of hip hop music for as long as I have, has most likely come to grips, at some point, with the fact that one of their favorite artists, perhaps someone they've been influenced by for years and grew up listening to, has fallen off or just ain't what they used to be. I go through this once every 7 or 8 years, and the following is a list of one time favorite rappers/artists that I've realized I just need to call it quits on. The reasons for each one may differ: lack musical output, lack of good musical output, a change in style, or just plain ole' getting outshined by other artists who do what they do (or did) better. And this does not mean I don't view these artists as dope artists! Some of them are my personal favorites. It's just the writing on the wall is spelling out to me that I probably should not, or won't, be buying anymore music from them.

1. Mos Def (AKA Yasiin Bey)- Mighty Mos Def was once a part of the Mount Rushmore of avant-garde MCs (along with Talib Kweli, Common, & Pharoah Monch) who spear headed the lyrically driven independent rap scene in the late 90s. He's got 2 undisputed classics under his belt with his solo debut Black On Both Sides and his collaborative LP with Talib Kweli under the Black Star name and is still in my personal top 10 of greatest MCs. But since Mos' last LP (2009's The Ecstatic), and changing his name, Mos has been busy with everything but rap, such as acting, activism, and bouncing back and forth between the States and South Africa. Yasiin Bey announced he was retiring from making music after releasing one last album (so technically he's calling it quits on us, we're not quitting him) with producer Ferrari Sheppard and released 2 new singles from the already delayed project that had a bizarre, electro-rock flavor to them. Nothing against left field sounds, but it just didn't measure up to his past work. If that was any indication of where he's going creatively, I hate to say it, but his best work is long behind him.

2. KRS-One- He's paid his dues, gifted us with classics, and made his indelible mark on hip-hop music. But lately, I haven't been feeling this elder statesman of rap mainly because of his ill advised decision to defend and excuse fellow hip hop pioneer Afrika Bambaataa amidst numerous allegations of sexually abusing and assaulting teenage boys in the 80s. He even said those who want Bambaataa to answer for his alleged crimes should quit hip-hop. I wasn't there when all this stuff went down allegedly, so of course I can't say what happened, but the evidence doesn't look good for Bam. And for KRS-One to give a full throated defense of this man, and make it about hip-hop, is irresponsible, obtuse, inadvisable, and makes me not want to hear any new music from this man.

3. RZA- He will always be in my top 5 greatest producers of all time, but the Abbot just doesn't have that magical touch anymore. After dropping the ball on the last two Wu Tang LPs, production-wise, favoring experimental and cinematic soundscapes over his grimier, darker, simpler, signature sound, I can't say I would buy anymore albums produced by him whether they're solo products or Wu affiliated.  

4. Lupe Fiasco- It hurts me to say this about my fellow Chicagoan. At one point, about 12 years ago, Lupe seemed poised to take over the game with his uncompromising, intellectual lyrics over slick, radio friendly production. The rap game had also evolved at that time to the point where Lupe's nerd-chic style was a welcome breath of fresh air amidst the hip-hop uniform of white tees, over-sized throwback jerseys, & New Era hats. But since 2007's The Cool, Lupe has not been able to give us consistent LPs that match his earlier work. A brief mixtape here, a musically off-center LP there...next thing you know, he's accumulated a pretty dare I say, average discography. It also doesn't help when you go around saying that your own albums aren't that good, even to you!

5. Slaughterhouse- I was so excited back when this group formed. It was a lyrical rap fan's wet dream seeing MCs Crooked I, Joell Ortiz, Royce Da 5'9", and Joe Budden form this supergroup. All these guys were proven, lyrical heavyweights in their own right, so if you combined them, and throw the support of the Shady/Interscope records juggernaut behind them, what could go wrong??!!! After releasing a handful of projects featuring ill-fitting beats over their aggressive flows, that never really lived up to the hype behind a group like this, and reportedly stalling their next release due to nitpicking and various other reasons, the group's overall momentum and buzz has seemed to fizzle out. I'm still pulling for these guys to get it together as a group, but to be honest, they all seem more focused and appear to perform their best on their solo projects as opposed to as a group.

6. Kanye West- Do I even need to explain this one? For me, part of the appeal of rap music is being able to relate to the lyrics and topics the MC is speaking on. Kanye at one time, I felt, provided a much needed voice in hip-hop for middle class black kids who grew up in the city and have an appreciation for certain "non-hood" things. Now, he's just that weird second cousin of ours who's won the lottery, moved out to the suburbs, is self absorbed, alienated from any kind of struggle, and likely voted for Trump. 

7. Jay Electronica- This one hurts me the most, and there is a part of me that is still willing to spend $15 on whatever album Jay Elec drops, whenever it drops. Jay has always struck me as an artist's artist's artist, a man who will be uncompromising with his music, but most of all, a lyrical beast who could put 95% of the rap game to shame. But unfortunately, homie just doesn't seem that interested in putting out music at the moment. He blessed us with phenomenal features, freestyles, and mixtape tracks as early as 2007, but after a few years of waiting for an official release...well, we're still waiting.  Maybe he doesn't want to dip his toes in this crazy, fraudulent rap industry? Maybe he's uninspired? Maybe he's just uninterested? Maybe whatever album he had in the works got mired in record label/A&R interference? Maybe he has bigger priorities on his plate right now? But this unofficial state of retirement he's in doesn't bode well for hearing an album from him anytime soon.

Picture courtesy of Google

Picture courtesy of Google

The Shift by Tyreek Peppers

Spring Break has arrived and a lot of schools are on break. Most children will be working, playing outside, and they’ll probably be in the house doing nothing but watching television. I, myself, tend to do a bit of self-education while on my week off—relaxing to keep my brain healthy and aware. My point is: how do you make the shift from working to doing nothing? Shifting from point A to point B is easy for some, but hard for others.

Even in my spare time I mentally push myself to learn something school didn’t teach me. I probably spend more time on the internet learning about things that my high school just won’t teach seniors such as myself. Like, did you know that alcohol is considered to be a drug? I’m a bit disappointed in myself for not knowing that. Alcohol is considered to be a drug because it reduces a person’s ability to think rationally and distorts one's judgment.

My initial thought on the matter was very different; I didn’t see alcohol as a drug. Since I chose to self-educate myself I can learn new things without the aid of a teacher. With the technology that human beings currently possess, maybe human teachers will be obsolete in the future. Time is always shifting and people should learn to adapt. I myself understand this, which is why I continue to learn.

Now, I’m not saying that a sudden shift is good or bad. What I’m trying to say is that life is unpredictable. The best way to handle an unpredictable situation is to learn how to adapt to change or shift. Like I previously stated, most people aren’t comfortable with shifting to a sudden situation. What other people find difficult, others find easy. Life itself shifts from time to time, and you can even feel the universe shift every now and then.      

The March by Tyreek Peppers

On March 7, 1965, Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. stepped foot in Selma, AL. Along with him was a group of over 600 people gathered—it was a demonstration. As the 600 people gathered on the edge of the city by the Edmund Pettus Bridge, that day became known as “Bloody Sunday”. In Alabama, blacks made up half of the population, but only two percent were registered voters. The Selma march was about the demand of fair voter registration.

Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. was a Baptist minister and social activist who had a lovely wife and and four children. Taking note of  Dr. King’s responsibility to his family, he took it upon himself to rid the world of segregation and bring people closer to each other. Dr. King was the man who led the Civil Rights movement in the United States from the mid-1950s until 1968. In 1968, Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. was assassinated.

On April 4, 2017, I attended a march. This wasn't just some random, meaningless march—the march was dedicated to Dr. King. The march took place at Freedom Corner and ended at the Grayson Center in Pittsburgh’s Hill District. Activist groups such 1Hood made a special appearance at the march.

A lot of people came out to support the march. Pittsburgh’s mayor even showed up to share a speech to the public. Early on in the event, there was a special performer from 1Hood. Sadly, I didn't attend the earlier portion because of school, but I'm pretty sure the it was amazing. Even though there were few people that attended the march to honor Dr. King and the problems minorities face in the US, I felt that it was a breakthrough.

An Angel for a Mother by Tyreek Peppers

Yesterday, I walked my mother from work and along the way we talked about what I wanted to do after high school. There was a deep pause for a minute, I told her I didn’t know. I really want to go to college, but on the other hand, I want to be a performer. After that I tried change the subject, by asking her what does she think the rest of the fam is doing. For a short second it worked. Well, not seconds—more like a couple of minutes.

I’ve been working all week, and when I come home I barely have time to check on them like I use to. I don’t even spend time with them on the weekend because I have other events to attend to. Then, she brought the topic right back up; then I told her I wanted to be a performer. When I told her, she give me a smile, say that she believes I could do it. I’ve always listened very closely to her words because her words always pushed me to achieve what I really wanted.

I listened to my father's words too, but he wasn’t always around. My mother was always by my side no matter what I did, whether it was bad or good. I used to do a lot of bad things when I was a child, but for her sake I had to make a change. I wanted my mother to see me other than a troubled child sitting in the principal's office because I was in another fight or talking back to a teacher. I told myself that my mother will only have to come up to the school to see the good things I could achieve.

No parent loves coming to the school to hear that their children got into some trouble. Parents feel embarrassed walking into the school office to hear the news. I know for a fact the parents weren’t happy sitting in that office; they didn’t have to say anything to me because I saw it on their faces. I always tried to call father because I knew that my mother would be upset—that and I lived in the same house. When they’d call my father, he’d never answered his phone. It was like he knew it was a bad call and never picked up, but my mother wouldn't let it past the first ring. My mother, no matter what, always answered her phone. It’s like she knew that her one of her babies was in trouble. She was always claimed to tell us that she was upset with what I did and that she still loved us for who we are—she shared her love between four boys equally. I wouldn’t be here today without my mother going through a lot of pain and I just want to say to her, “thank you.”

Tunnel Vision by Alyse Fowlks

image1.PNG

Hey, this is to all my ladies out there. I’m specifically speaking to my younger ladies who are in middle school and high school. Boys will always be there, so you can wait to have a boyfriend. I’m not saying having “boy” friends are bad, but you should stay away from relationships. They are nowhere near necessary during this stage of your life. It’s important to stay focused on your education, health and well-being. Boys aren’t bad, but they can be distracting; just as you can be to them. They are just like any other person that is annoying—but of course the boy that you like isn’t as easy to push away and block out your life like someone else.

Since I was five years old, people have told me to have friends but not “boy friends”, and of course It went in one ear and out of the other, but now I understand their reasoning. Luckily, I’ve listened to the advice people have told me. For example, someone once told me a man does not make up your happiness. You determine how you’re going to live your life and no one should control it except you. Oh yeah, don’t ever let a man thinks he owns you or controls you. If you are unsure about what I’m talking about, talk with your parents or friends, or just someone who you can talk to about what you’re going through. It’s important to talk with a person you trust before making a decision that could potentially put your life at risk. Always reach out to someone, if you are in need. You will not regret your decision, just make sure you’re decisive with who you choose to tell your personal information to.

Recently, I was talking to a boy and after we broke up it mentally drained me, and I felt somewhat unworthy. You shouldn’t get emotionally attached to someone who is not worried about your well-being and life in general. And, my problem was that I didn’t tell any adult about what I was going through—I just dealt with it. But, I found ways to get over the break-up and disconnection between us. I started going to the gym and finding more activities. I used to always be in some sort of activity like band, basketball, softball etc., but senior year has become very different. I started to not care about a lot of things, and started to slip on my grades all because of a boy.

Therefor, ladies, you don’t need a man to make up your happiness—stay focused on your education, health and well-being. I am happy I didn’t decide to do any harm to myself, because the obstacles do not last forever; they are only temporary. Trust and believe in god, and he will get you through whatever you are going through. You can also find a women’s or church group that will help you with your issues if you don’t believe your family can not assist you.  

Dear White People, You Gots To Chill!

 

 

Dear White People, You Gots To Chill!

By Bug One

 

   There's a saying that's existed for a long time now that goes "Only a hit dog hollers." And judging by the fallout from various caucasians over the 35 second teaser trailer for the upcoming Netflix series "Dear White People" (based off the underrated 2014 film), there are still plenty of insensitive trolls out there who frankly don't like to be told that they can't dehumanize minorities. To be honest, I heard about the white outrage over this trailer before I even heard that this new television series existed. And since I had already seen the movie, I'm thinking "Maybe they kicked it up a notch? Maybe in this trailer they are really holding up a mirror to all the bigots out there and really giving some scathing observations and criticisms." Then I saw the trailer. And to be honest, the only real take away was blackface=bad+offensive. That's it. No "why do white people put mayonnaise on and in everything?" No "Boy, they sure can't dance!" Not even a "Why did so many of you vote in a pathelogical liar into the White House?"  But then again, how much social commentary can you really fit in 35 seconds?! Apparently enough to piss off a segment of White America known as the "alt-right".

   A quick clip of a young black woman asking very nicely and articulately for her white schoolmates not to don blackface on Halloween because it is offensive was enough for some out there to say Netflix was promoting a show that encouraged "white genocide" and was "racist" and have organized a boycott of Netflix just for carrying the show. A show that hasn't even aired yet!  I really need someone to explain this one for me. Is it racist for an oppressed group to say "hey, stop oppressing us?" Or "please don't do that thing we find offensive."? Is asking a group to be a little more thoughtful in how they relate to another group equivalent to genocide??!!!? Maybe in their minds their right to be as ugly and as racist as they want to be is such an integral part of their identity and psyche, seeing us lowly darkies even DARE to tell them to stop is such a wigflip they have no choice but to react as if we're carving out a piece of their hearts? Maybe the ability and freedom to poke fun at and devalue other humans is just that precious to them and they feel that's all they have to instill a sense of pride in their pitiful selves and its worth fighting for? Maybe for some of them, that is all they have?  I don't know, and I'm sure I'll never understand. I just hope the show is as good as the movie, insightful, entertaining, and a huge success. And kudos to Netflix for carrying it.

   And to the white folks out there who feel a TV show is going to upend 300+ years of white supremacy and bring forth the death of the white race, in the words of EPMD, you gots to chill.

Mumble Rap Ain't My Cup Of Tea, But...

by Bug One   

 I got to say- I'm getting a little tired of hearing heads my age and older complaining about it. They have no rhymes, no vocabulary, they repeat the hook over more than half the track, it has no connection to the elements of hip hop culture, and even most of the beats sound the same... I've heard all the complaints. And all the complaints are valid. But my fellow aging heads need to give it a rest. The newest, most popular crop of MCs (and I use that term loosely) aren't my cup of tea personally and their music doesn't speak to me, but it doesn't have to. Hip Hop music has always been driven by the tastes of urban youth, and to be honest, I'm a thirty-something 9 to 5er, husband, and father who's already taking cholesterol medication and planning to move out to the suburbs as soon as I get my first win fall of cash. I don't sip lean. I don't pop pills. I don't turn up. Heck, I don't even think I've stepped foot in a club since 2009. Getting my brakes done and my front porch weather proofed is my idea of a productive weekend. So I recognize I'm not part of that young crowd that the Lil Yatchy's and Uzi Verts and Travis Scotts are making music for. Let the youngin's do their thing and have their music.

   Hip Hop music itself is almost 40 years old at this point. Just the music. B-boying and graffiti art are even older. But think about Rock music when it was 40 years old. From the 50s to the 90s, it's sound evolved and changed drastically. You had classic rock, heavy metal, soft-rock, folk rock, progressive rock, grunge, alternative, punk, the list goes on...all these sub-genres of rock n roll had their time, scene, and poster children that were representative of whatever they were being labeled as. The same thing  happened with Jazz. Between the 1920s and1960s we saw the emergence of swing, big band, free jazz, ragtime, bebop, Afro-Cuban, modal, and cool jazz and they all made significant contributions to the genre.  Now I'm not saying I believe mumble rap  is going to make a lasting impression and in the year 2037 there will be documentaries made on the genius and impact of the Slime Season releases, but I am saying no genre stays recognizable and forever identifiable by it's initial audience. Looking at what's happened with other genres in the past, it's really not all that unfathomable that hip hop will, and has, split into several sub-genres. We've seen boom bap, g-funk, backpack, true-school, conscious, southern, trap, crunk, and now whatever this newest stuff is called.

   I personally like hip hop to have banging boom bap-ish, soulful beats with substantive, conscious lyrics sprinkled in with battle ready bars (I have The UN's U N Or U Out bumping in the background as I write this). But I recognize that's not what everyone wants to hear. At the same time, fellow heads and casual rap fans who often complain about the current state of rap music have to put their money where their mouths are and buy and support what they deem to be real hip hop. I'm tired of seeing 35 year olds buying Drake and Future albums so they don't look old and out of touch, and then turning around and saying "Whatever happened to all the real hip-hop? These cats wouldn't be allowed to exist if 2Pac was still alive!"

   As far as these new mumble rappers not paying respect to those who came before them, it's annoying and bothersome that there's a disconnect between rappers who are popping now and the aging class of rappers who paved the way for them and made it possible for these kids to live off their "craft". But let's be honest, most people don't idolize those who came 20 or 30 years before them. Most people look at whatever was being made during their coming of age as the standard. There's no way I will convince my parents' generation that 90s R&B could hang with, or be better than, what was being made in the Motown/Chess records era. Nor do I need to.  Every generation has their idols. I grew up on Wu Tang Clan, A Tribe Called Quest, Fugees, De La, Mobb Deep, Snoop, The Roots, Black Star, etc., and while I have a respect for who and what came before them, I don't own a single album by Whodini, Just-Ice, or the Ultramagnetic MCs (with the exception of a few singles from a golden -era rap compilation CD). I did my research and due diligence on the Slick Ricks, Kool G Raps, and KRS-Ones and even copped most of their discographies, but some cats I just never got around to. I'm saying that to say these mumble rappers shouldn't have to know every Nas verse or list Biggie and 2Pac in their top 5 dead or alive. Cause they didn't grow up on them. Something could be said for the lack of respect shown to the greats, but that's a topic for another day.

   In the meantime, let these kids rock out. Let them live. Let them grow. Let them mature. Cause one day, they'll be us.

Diaspora by James Perry

Pay attention to why you’re here at all times. Notice you were forced here and now they have to reason with your opinion. Why is that? The word is Diaspora. The word brought cultures to the states, people and bare essentials needed to trade. The most controversial thing about diaspora is if it was good or not for the states and if the impact was revolutionary, because after all, most cultures and things that helped shape modern day America were forced to do so.

The origin of diaspora came from Greek ideology with the idea of transferring one group or population to another area. Started with the transferring of foreigners overseas, there was able to an increase in ethnic groups within different nations. Using the resource www.economist.com and their November 19 2011 edition of Economist Magazine “The magic of Diasporas” there were Lebanese in West Africa, Japanese is Brazil, the Welsh found in Patagonia and West Africans in Southern China. Having so many different cultures spread out across the world can cause 2 things to happen. There is an exchange of language and also an exchange of trust and knowledge taking place. For example, lets say there is a Chinese trader who lives in Indonesia. One day he is walking through midtown and notices that a local market doesn’t have anymore-cheap umbrellas and is looking to sell some. The Chinese trader has a cousin that lives in Shenzhen and knows someone who owns and umbrella factory. Trust is gained between the market owner and the Chinese man who was able to bring him umbrellas before the rain season ended. Now, in these situations for these countries, law is really weak. So the Chinese man could’ve easily gotten the market robbed or taken over at any minute. Trust leads to friendship but also leads to the townspeople knowing that China has certain resources the town may need!

Economist.com also states that a Harvard Business School study shows that American companies that employ lots of ethnic Chinese people find it much easier to set up in China without a joint venture with a local firm. Meaning that if Americans hire Chinese people, the chances of getting different branches nationally double because of who works for the company. That also means that diaspora helped spread money as well. If Chinese people begin to work at McDonalds and like the food, it’s only a matter of time before you start to see McDonalds in Asia. Foreigners who are rich, and support this spread of ideas tend to also send money to fund these companies to keep running, that creates a diversity in currency being used worldwide, and a diversity in cultural food. All of these factors help fuel the mixing pot. Moving certain races to different areas also help create the mixing of races.

Wikipedia gave me information stating; In America, the merging of multiple ethnic groups from around the world created multi-ethnic societies. In Central and South America, most people are descended from European, indigenous American, and African ancestry. In Brazil, where in 1888 nearly half the population was descended from African slaves, which means that the physical characteristics varied and that during this time period, your average person from Brazil could look completely different compared to his/her neighbor because of the ancestry that was placed years before. In the United States, there was historically a greater European colonial population in relation to African slaves, especially in the Northern Tier.

There was considerable racial intermarriage in colonial Virginia, and other forms of racial mixing during the slavery and post-Civil War years. Racist Jim Crow and anti-miscegenation laws passed after the Reconstruction era in the South in the late nineteenth century, plus waves of vastly increased immigration from Europe in the 19th and 20th centuries, maintained some distinction between racial groups. In the early 20th century, to institutionalize racial segregation, most southern states adopted the "one drop rule", which defined and recorded anyone with any African ancestry as black, even of obvious majority white or Native American ancestry. One of the results of this implementation was the loss of records of Indian-identified groups, who were classified only as black because of being mixed race.

Diaspora continued to take shape and form the United states even more after most African Americans no longer wanted to live in the south, this can be considered the Great Migration, which is an example of diaspora. According to www.Inmotionaame.org Getting to "the Promised Land" did not come cheap, so many migrants made the journey in stages, stopping off and working in places in the South, then continuing on their way. This so-called step migration could take a very long time. Painter Jacob Lawrence recalled that his family was "moving up the coast, as many families were during that migration .We moved up to various cities until we arrived - the last two cities I can remember before moving to New York were Easton, Pennsylvania, and Philadelphia." During the early period, northern employers helped the migrants with transportation. They were given passes that often deducted future fair. These agents, who were paid a flat fee for each worker they produced, were selective, favoring those who appeared in good health, men over women, the young over the old.

The railroads, in dire need of workers to transport war material and maintain the rail lines, were among the first employers to recruit. In the summer of 1916, the Pennsylvania Railroad brought sixteen thousand southern African Americans north to do unskilled labor. The agents from the Illinois Central Railroad issued passes to bring workers to Chicago. Other industries central to the burgeoning war economy, such as the steel mills, made great and unprecedented promises to prospective African-American employees. These workers were poor and eager to take advantage of any opportunity. "Just give us a chance" was their common refrain.

So many southerners made their way north on their own that employers soon cut back on travel passes. Meanwhile, local authorities were trying to deny the agent’s access to the black community. In some cases, their passes were not honored at the depots. On many occasions, travelers were pulled off trains to prevent them from leaving the South.

Do you see how the idea of creating a melting pot full of ideas and cultural beliefs can create a new nation by removing a population from their homeland? Whether it be by force or lust for travel, Diaspora helped spread out populations across the world.